Vermont adopts the most comprehensive plastics ban in U.S.

Vermont adopts the most comprehensive plastics ban in U.S.

Single-use plastics—from straws to retail bags—will be illegal in Vermont by summer 2020.

Vermont has joined the growing list of states swearing off single-use plasticsby adopting the nation’s broadest restrictions yet on shopping bags, straws, drink stirrers, and foam food packaging.

The new law, which takes effect in July 2020, prohibits retailers and restaurants from providing customers with single-use carryout bags, plastic stirrers, or cups, takeout, or other food containers made from expanded polystyrene. Straws may be provided to customers on request. People requiring straws for medical conditions are exempted from the law.

The bag ban applies only to bags at point-of-sale and not to bags sold as household trash bags or bags used in grocery stores to contain loose produce.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott signed the bill into law without comment Monday. Earlier he had expressed doubts about the new ten-cent-per-bag charge retailers and restaurants are required to collect for paper bags. Small paper bags are exempted from the ten-cent charge.

“Throughout the session, he did say that given the overwhelming bipartisan support in the legislature and having not heard opposition from the retailers who will be impacted, he expected to sign it,” says Rebecca Kelley, Scott’s communications director.

Multiple states have banned one or more of these plastics. But Vermont is the first to ban all four products in a single bill.

 

“Vermont has now established a national precedent of tackling three of the worst examples of plastic packaging in one sweeping state law,” says Judith Enck, a former EPA regional administrator who heads a plastics pollution initiative at Bennington College, in a statement.

Not all bags created equal

Hawaii, California, Maine, and New York have banned disposable plastic bags. Supporters of Vermont’s bill say lawmakers took extra steps to promote bag reuse and discourage bag makers from skirting bag bans by making them thicker. As a result, the Vermont ban outlaws plastic carryout bags that do not have stitched handles.

Jen Duggan, director of the Vermont Conservation Law Foundation, says cities and counties that have passed bag bans often defined prohibited bags by their thickness or applied measurements requiring that it carry a certain weight a certain distance.

“What happened was the bag makers flooded the markets with thicker bags,” she says.

The requirement for stitched handles, she says, was simply an easier solution. Because of the cost of stitching handles, it effectively ensures that carryout bags will be made from cloth or reusable polypropylene, encouraging reuse‒one of the goals of the law.

Matt Seaholm, executive director of the American Progressive Bag Alliance, an industry lobbying group, in an interview in April cautioned that bag bans result in the importation of thicker bags manufactured in China. He added that plastic retail bags in the United States are regulated by more ordinances than any other plastic product, and suggested a better solution for sustainability is for bags to be returned by customers to retailers, where they can be sent back to the factory and remade into new bags.

Vermont’s action builds on a growing movement across the world to ban single-use plastics. Plastic bags have been taxed or banned in 127 nations, according to a United Nations count. The European Union banned the top plastic items found on European beaches earlier this spring.

Earlier this year, Vermont’s most famous business, Ben and Jerry’s, announced plans to eliminate the use of plastic straws and other single-use plastics in its 600 ice cream shops worldwide.

This story is part of Planet or Plastic?—our multiyear effort to raise awareness about the global plastic waste crisis. Learn what you can do to reduce your own single-use plastics, and take your pledge.

Source: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/06/vermont-adopts-most-comprehensive-single-use-plastics-ban/

By: Laura Parker

1% for the Planet Breweries Team-Up On “Brut for the Planet IPA”

Brut For The Planet
Brut India Pale Ale
7.2% Alcohol by Volume

SAN DIEGO, CA — Pure Project Brewing teamed up with fellow California 1% for the Planet Members, Topa Topa Brewing Co. and Smog City Brewing Co. to brew “Brut for the Planet IPA.”

This Brut IPA is intended to resemble a West Coast IPA melded with the dryness of a Brut Champagne. A clean and crisp IPA, with a nice smooth lingering bitterness. Mellow hoppy aroma up front, with a subtle light body, and a fantastically dry finish.

The beer aims to raise awareness about the need for environmental action, and how breweries that are a part of the 1% for the Planet movement are taking action.

“Beer is an agricultural product and if we do not take care of the land that sustains our agriculture, there will eventually be nothing left to brew with,” said Winslow Sawyer of Pure Project Brewing.

 

Since the breweries teamed up, fellow California brewery, Alvarado Street Brewing also just announced their 1% For The Planet membership.

“Good beer can reflect the health of our planet,” said Kate Williams, 1% for the Planet’s CEO. “We are thrilled to continue to add to the robust list of breweries around the world that are taking action on the environment.”

1% for the Planet has provided these breweries with a unique opportunity to give back to their local communities as well as help to grow their business.

“All in all our partnership with 1% has been a wonderful addition to our brand here at Topa Topa,” said Jack Dyer of Topa Topa Brewing Co. “The relationships we have established in the community have helped propel our growth as a company.”

For more on 1% for the Planet’s craft beer membership, please visit: http://www.onepercentfortheplanet.org/what-we-do/our-stories/14-our-stories/228-our-craft-beer-members

About Pure Project Brewing

San Diego based Pure Project is focused on creating an impact both in our business, locally and around the world. At their brewery, Pure Project aims to reduce and reuse as much waste as possible including encouraging customers to bring coolers and bags instead of us using plastic snap packs. They reuse old grain bags for trash and giant rubber bands instead of shrink wrap to name a few. They are committed to sourcing locally and recently start using California grown and malted organic grain which has been a huge step forward towards sustainability.

Currently to meet their 1% for the Planet annual giving. They donate 1% of all revenue to San Diego Surfrider, San Diego Coastkeeper, Outdoor Outreach and the Conservation Alliance.

About Topa Topa Brewing Co.

Ventura based Topa Topa Brewing Co. utilizes their partnership with 1% for the Planet by focusing on a local 1% for the planet approved nonprofit each quarter. Not only does that nonprofit get the benefit of receiving 1% of sales that quarter, but the partner is also offered the opportunity to engage with our community directly in our taproom. They do this by holding at least 3 events during the quarter at our taproom(s).

About 1% for the Planet

1% for the Planet is a global organization that connects dollars and doers to accelerate
smart environmental giving. Through our business and individual membership, 1% for the Planet inspires people to support environmental organizations through annual membership and everyday actions. Started in 2002 by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and Craig Mathews, founder of Blue Ribbon Flies, our members have given more than $175 million to environmental nonprofits to date. Today, 1% for the Planet is a network of more than 1,500 member businesses, a new and expanding core of hundreds of individual members, and thousands of nonprofit partners in more than 60 countries.

Posted:

Source: http://pfpitches.com/1-for-the-planet/brut-for-the-planet/

The plastic industry is on track to produce as many emissions as 600 coal-fired power plants

When you think about plastic, what comes to mind? Microplastics at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, whales dying with truckloads of garbage in their bellies, that zero-waste Instagram influencer you follow?

A new report shows it’s high time to think more about the fossil fuels that go into making those plastic products. The global plastic industry is on track to produce enough emissions to put the world on track for a catastrophic warming scenario, according to the Center for International Environmental Law analysis. In other words, straws aren’t just bad for unsuspecting turtles; plastic is a major contributor to climate change.

If the plastic industry is allowed to expand production unimpeded, here’s what we’re looking at: By 2030, global emissions from that sector could produce the emissions equivalent of more than 295 (500-megawatt) coal plants. By 2050, emissions could exceed the equivalent of 615 coal plants.

That year, the cumulative greenhouse gas emissions from production of single-use plastics like bags and straws could compose between 10 and 13 percent of the whole remainder of our carbon budget. That is, the amount of CO2 we’re allowed to emit if we want to keep emissions below the threshold scientists say is necessary to ensure a liveable planet. By 2100, even conservative estimates pin emissions from plastics composing more than half of the carbon budget.

So, congrats on ordering that metal straw from Amazon! But the report shows that the plastics industry is still planning on a major expansion in production.

Here are a few more takeaways from the report, which looked at the emissions produced by the plastics industry starting in 2015 and projected what emissions from that sector could look like through the end of the century:

  • Of the three ways to get rid of plastics — recycling, landfilling, or incinerating — incinerating is the most energy intensive. In 2015, emissions from incinerating plastic in the United States were estimated to be around 5.9 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent.
  • This year, production and incineration of plastic products will make as many emissions as 189 coal power plants — 850 million metric tons of greenhouse gases.
  • Plastics that wind up in the ocean could even fuck with the ocean’s ability to do what it has historically done a superb job at: sequestering carbon. That’s because the phytoplankton and lil ocean critters that help capture the CO2 at the surface of the ocean and drag it under are being compromised by — you guessed it — microplastic.

But it doesn’t look like the industry is going to slow its roll on refining oil for plastics anytime soon. In 2015, 24 ethylene facilities in the U.S. produced the emissions equivalent of 3.8 million cars. There are 300 more petrochemical facilities underway in the U.S. Two of those, one being built by ExxonMobil and another by Shell, could produce emissions equivalent to 800,000 new cars on the road per year.

So if you’re gonna boycott single-use plastics, keep in mind that you’re not just doing it for the turtles — you’re doing it for us.

Source: https://grist.org/article/the-plastic-industry-is-on-track-to-produce-as-many-emissions-as-600-coal-fired-power-plants/?utm_content=buffer98a48&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer&fbclid=IwAR0SllSaExFuO1A20oPRJHEewQBmYNrmI3jCXO_nm7hi0dSpCNhcxmNbuXE